Cancer Screening

Cervical Cancer Screening

  • Cervical screening (a smear test) checks the health of your cervix. The cervix is the opening to your womb from your vagina.
  • It's not a test for cancer, it's a test to help prevent cancer.
  • All women and people with a cervix aged 25 to 64 should be invited by letter.
  • During the screening appointment, a small sample of cells will be taken from your cervix.
  • The sample is tested for changes to the cells of your cervix.
  • Finding abnormal changes early means they can be monitored or treated so they do not get a chance to turn into cervical cancer.
  • You'll get your results by letter, usually in about 2 weeks.

Click here to learn more about what to expect when you go for your cervical screening.

 

Bowel Cancer Screening

Bowel cancer is a common type of cancer in both men and women. About 1 in 20 people will get it during their lifetime. Screening can help detect bowel cancer at an early stage, when it's easier to treat. It can also be used to help check for and remove small growths in the bowel called polyps, which can turn into cancer over time.

Click here to find out more about how to do the test.

Breast Cancer Screening

  • Breast screening aims to find breast cancers early. It uses an X-ray test called a mammogram that can spot cancers when they're too small to see or feel.
  • But there are some risks of breast cancer screening that you should be aware of.
  • As the likelihood of getting breast cancer increases with age, all women aged from 50 to their 71st birthday, and registered with a GP are automatically invited for breast cancer screening every 3 years.In the meantime, if you're worried about breast cancer symptoms, such as a lump or area of thickened tissue in a breast, or you notice that your breasts look or feel different from what's normal for you, don't wait to be offered screening – see your GP.Related image
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